January 19, 2022

The Disability Reporting Handbook is here

The media should reflect, connect with and include all people. This handbook has been created to assist journalists to do just that, with a particular focus on various communities with disability. 

More than two years (and multiple lockdowns) in the making, it has been produced by a team of media professionals with lived experience of disability, in collaboration with peak Disabled People's Organisations and diversity advocates. In designing and writing this handbook, we made sure we lived by the golden rule - nothing about us without us. 

While we encourage you to read the entire handbook, it has been designed to enable time-poor, task-rich media professionals to skip to key areas to get the practical knowledge they need to better report on and with people with disability. 

We realise that language, culture and understanding changes, and we aim to review and update this handbook in the future. We hope this guide leads to a more inclusive media, and with it, a more inclusive world - one which recognises and welcomes the true spectrum of human diversity. 

The DRH Team.

Download the full Handbook here. 



Also in News

Adaptive fashion for people with disability showcased in Australian first
Adaptive fashion for people with disability showcased in Australian first

May 17, 2022

The history-making show featured 10 models with disability from across Australia, including disability advocate Lisa Cox, actor and disability advocate Chloe Hayden and Queensland Australian of the Year 2021, Dr Dinesh Palipana, who said the experience of taking part in the adaptive runway was "indescribable".
Here’s what it was like to be in Fashion Week’s first adaptive show
Here’s what it was like to be in Fashion Week’s first adaptive show

May 17, 2022

‘Unexpected’, ‘unbelievable’ and ‘unreal’ were all words I heard to describe the Adaptive Clothing Collective at this year’s Afterpay Australian Fashion Week (AAFW). It was clear that founder Jessie Sadler and lead designer Carol Taylor had achieved one of the things they set out to do with this new collection for Australia’s first inclusive fashion label, Christina Stephens: to dispel the myth that clothing adapted for people with disabilities could not be fashionable, stylish, glamorous, luxurious and even a little sexy. (Inside Retail)
Adaptive Clothing Collective runway makes an emotive case for universal design
Adaptive Clothing Collective runway makes an emotive case for universal design

May 17, 2022

Awash with innovative, inclusive designs and bold colours, JAM and Christina Stephens’ collections make clear people with disability deserve to be seen and have their needs met. (Harpers Bazaar)